Burying the Lede: ‘Orange is the New Black’ recap for ‘Don’t Make Me Come Back There’

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The relationship between mother and child has been a strong theme underscoring this whole season, and it’s come to a head in this episode with the aptly-titled ‘Don’t Make Me Come Back There.’ Aleida has never been what anyone would call a good mother. Even in the first season, through Daya’s flashback, Aleida proved herself to be selfish and uncaring. She’d freely leave her slew of young children to go to dinner when they didn’t have anything to eat and she’d sort drugs in their kitchen while her kids observed.

It’s not until Daya starts having contractions that Aleida begins to consider the repercussions of her hands-off parenting approach. In intense pain and with no screen to filter her thoughts, Daya pushes Aleida away and accuses her of wanting to “sell the baby.” While it’s true that Aleida wanted some financial gain from the situation, her flashbacks show that it wasn’t her sole motivation.

Aleida sent Daya to summer camp when she was a young child because she admits she wants Daya to have a better life. Her mother’s response is, “Even if it doesn’t include you?” (It is pretty hard to blame Aleida, considering that at the likely age of eight Daya knows what a condom looks like and can distinguish it from an uninflated balloon.) Once Daya does go to camp, it’s hard for Aleida to initially let go, but it’s even harder for her to accept the idea that Daya had fun without her. Her selfishness extends passed even the eventual mistreatment of her children when she emotionally manipulates Daya into believing that her time at camp was unnecessary. Daya not only made three best friends (and six regular friends) at camp, but also found her talent in art. Aleida is quick to erase the all of the benefits of sending Daya away just to make herself feel more worthwhile.

While lamenting the absence of her child, Maria confesses to Aleida, “I’m not freaking out because she needs me. I’m freaking out because I need her.” Aleida understands that every action she’s taken in relation to Daya has been for her own use and benefit, and until now she’s never tried to relate Daya’s feelings to hers. But in seeing Daya in pain and wanting to help while Daya pushes back, she finally admits that she’s a terrible mother: “I loved you. I wanted you around me. And now here you are, doing the same stupid shit I did… I never want you to feel the way I feel.” Though Daya doesn’t realize it, it’s in this moment that Aleida admits that putting the child up for adoption was less about the money, and more about letting it have a chance in the world. She understands that letting go is the hardest thing she could do, but keeping it while its mother is in prison is not giving it the life it deserves.

As Daya is being taken to the hospital, it’s heartbreaking to watch Aleida look on, knowing she can’t be there to help her daughter get through childbirth. Still, she did the best thing she could for Daya by telling Mama ‘Stache that the baby had died. It may have gone against what Daya ultimately decided she wanted to do, but the gesture proved that Aleida didn’t care about the money. For perhaps the first time, she thought of her daughter’s needs before her own.

RANDOM THOUGHTS:
– Keeping in line with the motherly theme, Taystee now realizes she’s the mom of her group. She may not have asked for it, but she’s definitely the best at it.
– Just as Piper admits that she’s not very good at being on her own, Stella tells her she’s getting out. It’s unfortunate for Piper, but she really should get over her serial monogamy at some point.
– Red’s storyline in this episode was a micro plot all of its own. And talk about suspension of disbelief! How the hell are they able to get away with this dinner?!
– It’s hard not to root for Boo and Pennsatucky to use their “doggy night-night pills” to get back at Coates, but I’m glad they didn’t end up doing it.
– Sophia’s plot seems as though it’s been finalized, with her post-jumping trip to the SHU. It wasn’t my favorite this season, but the social commentary was definitely worth mentioning.
– The addition of the mysterious yard chicken was wonderful, especially since it also points out its origin: the hole in the fence where Chang keeps her oranges. So many great details!
– Is Soso dead?!?!
– Best line of the episode: “I guess she lost faith. Either that or there’s some kind of flaw in our randomly improvised Norma-based theological system.”

SEASON THREE RECAPS
EP. 1  /  EP. 2  /  EP. 3  /  EP. 4  /  EP. 5  /  EP. 6  / EP. 7  / EP. 8  /  EP. 9  / EP. 10  /  EP. 11  / EP. 13

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One response to “Burying the Lede: ‘Orange is the New Black’ recap for ‘Don’t Make Me Come Back There’

  1. Pingback: God is a Verb: ‘Orange is the New Black’ recap for ‘Trust No Bitch’ | it's your newsfeed·

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